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ARCHITECTURE AND MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONIC SCIENTIFIC - EDUCATIONAL JOURNAL ON SCIENTIFIC-TECHNOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL-METHODICAL ASPECTS OF MODERN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION AND DESIGNING WITH THE USAGE OF VIDEO AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES


Article TOUCHES TO THE GENESIS AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE MODERN ARCHITECTURAL FIELD
Authors V. Melnikova, Moscow Institute of Architecture (State Academy), Moscow, Russia
Abstract The article provides an overview of the content and the genesis of knowledge structure that defines the modern architectural and urban-planning agenda. The current definition of the agenda continues to shape within the modernists paradigm with its industrial model having the following characteristics: functional segregation, centralized planning, the vision of the city as a hierarchical constructor, buildings as objects, architects as artists, focusing on points of growth and technological innovation, etc.

The situation is supported by the fact that the key symbolic positions still remain in the hands nurtured modernist architectural community, which has ensured their dominance in views across the professional training system. Herewith, due to the weakness of a critical opposition any views, that deny the modernist paradigm, effectively taken beyond the professional debate as "reactionary" or "ineffective".

In this regard, the conclusion is that the most likely scenario for the dominant paradigm removal is its independent collapse under the weight of internal failures that have successfully overcome in the symbolic space, through a constant reinvention of the modernism.
Keywords: modernism, structure of architectural knowledge, genesis of the modernists paradigm
article Article (RUS)
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